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Posts Tagged ‘theology’

I’ve been driving the nails
firmly in your tree
You’ve been talking to your Father
on behalf of me

Nothing at these check points
I care to defend
So why do I raise the hammer up
and drive the nails again?

+ Bill Mallonee/Vigilantes of Love, “Driving the Nails” (1995)

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Anyone looking for the meaning of life has nowhere else to go. It is revealed in everyone’s body—in masculinity and femininity. There lies the answer to the universal question: “What does it mean to be human?” There we find the law of the gift inscribed in our humanity. This is why misunderstanding and misuse of sexuality have such dire consequences for man and for society.

+ Christopher West, Theology of the Body Explained, 99

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There is no good trying to be more spiritual than God. God never meant man to be a purely spiritual creature. That is why He uses material things like bread and wine to put the new life into us. We may think this rather crude and unspiritual. God does not: He invented eating. He likes matter. He invented it.

– C.S. Lewis

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Deeply imbedded in the truth of anthropology and ethics is man and woman’s call to “be fruitful and multiply.” This original divine blessing corresponds with their creation in God’s image. As the prologue noted, the capacity to “pro-create” (not as a response to biological instinct but by the free choice proper to persons) enables them to participate in the creative, covenant love of God.

+ Christopher West, Theology of the Body Explained, 62

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Christ—the theological Word made flesh—is the link between the human person and the ultimate reality. Christ himself is ultimate reality. In his body “given up for us,” we come to see the ultimate meaning of our own bodies revealed. In this way, “Christ fully reveals man to himself.”

+ Christopher West, Theology of the Body Explained

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Man is a subject because he is free to determine his own actions. He is not bound by instinct like an animal. If he feels that he is, then he does not experience the truth of his own humanity, but the domination of concupiscence that greatly diminishes the truth of his humanity.

+ Christopher West, Theology of the Body Explained

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Christ’s resurrection is a reality “ingrafted” in our humanity. Even though our bodies are sown “in weakness” and are “perishable,” we bear in ourselves at the same time, “the interior desire for glory.” God put it there “in the beginning”—not to frustrate us by dashing our hopes, but to lead us to fulfillment in him. All hopes, therefore, must be placed in our resurrection. Then the body that we experience as perishable will be raised imperishable. The body we experience as weighed down in dishonor and weakness will be raised in glory and power. For what is sown a physical body is raised a spiritual body.

+ Christopher West, Theology of the Body Explained, 268

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